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ISSN Print: 2394-7500, ISSN Online: 2394-5869, CODEN: IJARPF

Impact Factor: RJIF 8.4

International Journal of Applied Research

Vol. 3, Issue 4, Part I (2017)

A Topological model of moderate exercise and chronic stress that produces counteractive effects on different areas of the brain

Author(s)
Dr. Amitabha Kar
Abstract
It is well known fact that, regular, "moderate", physical exercise is an established non-pharmacological form of treatment for depressive disorders. Brain lateralization has a significant role in the progress of depression. External stimuli such as various stressors or exercise influence the higher functions of the brain (cognition and affect). These effects often do not follow a linear course. Therefore, nonlinear dynamics seem best suited for modeling many of the phenomena, and putative global pathways in the brain, attributable to such external influences. The well-known neurotransmitters serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (D) and norepinephrine (NE) all have various receptor subtypes. This topological model describes that 'Stress' increases the activity/concentration of some particular subtypes of receptors (designated nts) for each of the known (and unknown) neurotransmitters in the right anterior (RA) and left posterior (LP) regions (cortical and subcortical) of the brain, and has the converse effects on a different set of receptor subtypes (designated nth). In contrast, 'Exercise' increases nth activity/concentration and/or reduces nts activity/concentration in the LA and RP areas of the brain. These effects may be initiated by the activation of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) (among others) in exercise and its suppression in stress.
Pages: 585-592  |  538 Views  14 Downloads
How to cite this article:
Dr. Amitabha Kar. A Topological model of moderate exercise and chronic stress that produces counteractive effects on different areas of the brain. Int J Appl Res 2017;3(4):585-592.
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