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International Journal of Applied Research
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ISSN Print: 2394-7500, ISSN Online: 2394-5869, CODEN: IJARPF

International Journal of Applied Research

Vol. 6, Issue 12, Part C (2020)

Prevalence of food insecurity in low-income population in Ohio, USA

Author(s)
Shagufta Kaskar, Niveditha Rachamalla, Dr. Kirby Overton, Linda Hamilton, Tommie Harner, Dr. Shashikant Vaidya, Ron Rooker, Professor Jenny Evans, Dr. Lisa Bradley and Major Dianna Morales
Abstract
This study was carried out to examine Food Insecurity (FI) in a low-income population in Ohio, America. The study involved screening of 351 participants-who were over 18 years of age, Ohio residents, living in Allen, Hancock or Seneca counties. The study assessed different parameters such as race, financial status, education, family structure, food expenditure and health. Statistical tools were used for data analysis. Participants were divided into 12 income groups according to monthly household income, highest participants were found in income group 500-999 category (36.66%) and lowest in 3500-3999 category (1.87%). The highest amount of participants were found in food insecurity score group (FIS) 5 (20.23%), while lowest in FI groups 1 and 2 (1.95%). As income increased, FI index in total participants decreased including males and females. The Black/ African American population was highest with food insecurity observed in FIS group 10 (3.77%) Caucasian population was highest with food insecurity in the number amongst all the ethnic groups. Hispanic / Latino population was lowest with food insecurity in the study and found in FIS group 4, 5 and 6 (.27%). Native American/ American Indian population was highest with food insecurity in the FIS group 7 (1.08%) and least was in group 10 (.27%). Participants having some college education were observed with food insecurity in all the FIS score category except in groups 1, 2 and 3. In the study, 50.59% of the population was self-reported diabetic, 65.55% self-reported hypertensive, and 45.56% population having reported some type of heart trouble. This study highlighted the importance of screening for FI, particularly in low-income populations, and our understanding of the association between FI and chronic disease in low-income population.
Pages: 175-182  |  28 Views  5 Downloads
How to cite this article:
Shagufta Kaskar, Niveditha Rachamalla, Dr. Kirby Overton, Linda Hamilton, Tommie Harner, Dr. Shashikant Vaidya, Ron Rooker, Professor Jenny Evans, Dr. Lisa Bradley, Major Dianna Morales. Prevalence of food insecurity in low-income population in Ohio, USA. Int J Appl Res 2020;6(12):175-182.
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